Crafts

How To Make Glitter Slime

How about some glitter slime? Hi there. I’ve been so busy with my new Instant Pot (the 8 Quart Instant Pot that I just purchased) that I have neglected my other posts, slime being one of those posts. I’ve been feeling so guilty about that that I decided to make slime with a little something extra. Yep, you guessed it, GLITTER! All different glorious colors of glitter. The kids and I had so much fun making this special glitter slime and playing with it. It’s truly addicting. If we hadn’t run out of glitter glue I would still be at it I tell you.  While we were occupied making our third batch of slime the funniest thing happened. Our puppy came along out of nowhere and grabbed our big ball of slime thinking it was a bouncy ball I guess. Boy was she disappointed when it went nowhere and just dripped through her teeth. It was like some bizarre party trick. And have no worries no animals were harmed during the making of this post! 🙂 Here are the ingredients:

1 Elmer’s Glitter Glue

glitter glue

1 Cup Water

1 tsp. Borax

1 Tb Water

{ You can replace the Glitter Glue for regular white glue to make normal slime }

And now for the instructions:

TUTORIAL

1.

Mix 1 tsp. Borax and 1 Cup water together.

You can find the Borax at your local stores in the Laundry section.

I do so love the box! O:)

2.

pouring glitter glue into bowl

Have your little helpers empty the Glitter Glue into a bowl.

Can you hardly wait or what! 🙂

3.

Add 1 TB. Water to the glue and mix it together.

This will help the glue to become a little more pliable.

4.

Then pour the Borax mixture inside of the bowl.

Let their little bitty hands make the mixture come to life by mixing the glue into the mixture.

Right away you will see how the Glitter Slime will start to form.

This is where you’ll hear all the hoopla about their magic concoction as it all comes to life.

Isn’t it pretty?

***Special note***

Don’t leave the slime in the water mixture too long since it will make the slime too hard.

Finish mixing it in your hands.

Now there’s your magic glitter slime made all by you! WOWIE!!!:)

glitter slime

How did your slime turn out? I would love to see a picture (send it to shootingstarsandlittletoycars@gmail.com)!
Kelli M. Riebesehl Mommy Blogger
Follow along with Shooting Stars And Little Toy Cars on Facebook,TwitterGoogle+Pinterest or Subscribe by Email or Bloglovin’!

Some of the links in this post are our referral links (to products we not only believe in but also very happily use ourselves), meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a commission if you make a purchase. The commission we earn helps us to keep our blogs up and running smoothly. We thank you! O:)

All activities here are activities I feel are safe for my own children.  As your child’s parents/guardians, you will need to decide what you feel is safe for your family.  I always encourage contacting your child’s pediatrician for guidance if you are not sure about the safety/age appropriateness of an activity. All activities on this blog are intended to be performed with adult supervision.  Appropriate and reasonable caution should be used when activities call for the use of materials that could potentially be harmful, such as scissors, or items that could present a choking risk (small items), or a drowning risk (water activities), and with introducing a new food/ingredient to a child (allergies).  Observe caution and safety at all times.  The author and blog disclaim liability for any damage, mishap, or injury that may occur from engaging in any of these activities on this blog.

Kelli M. Riebesehl | Mommy Blogger

homemade finger paints

Hi there! Are you like me and started summer off with a bang- activities here there and everywhere only to find yourself at a loss for what to do on your first down day? Well if you are, then have no fear for I have some really great ideas in store for all ages of kiddos out there and homemade finger paints just happen to be one of those great projects that you can throw together in no time. 

Painting for toddlers and children is a very relaxing activity and also a wonderful way to stimulate their senses.

When I was little, I LOVED messy art projects and finger paints were my favorite. I would get so excited at both home and school when they coated the table with a protective film of either plastic or paper preparing for finger painting that I was always the first seated at the table.

As It turns out, I passed on my love for messy art onto my kids. They go through whole sets of finger paints in one sitting. I don’t want to keep buying expensive fingerpaint from the craft store every couple of days, so, I set out to find out just what my alternatives were and believe it or not, making homemade finger paints is where it’s at.

So without further adieu, here is my recipe for homemade finger paint which every age kid (and most adults unless something is seriously wrong with them 🙂 love):

  • Cornstarch
  • Cream of tartar
  • Water
  • Food coloring
  • Silicone muffin cups
  • Cardstock paper

When I first started messing with this finger painting recipe, I did not think it would work. We use cornstarch in a lot of our homemade recipes, and I didn’t see how it could turn into a good paint, but with a bit of help from the cream of tartar, it came out so great!

In a bowl, mix 1 part cornstarch and 1 part water.

On the stove, heat 4 parts water until simmering, but no need to boil it.

Pour the warm water into the cornstarch water and stir.

Very quickly, it will form into a pudding-like texture. At this point, add in a teaspoon of cream of tartar. This gives the cornstarch a shiny, flexible texture and makes it more like paint.

Once the goo cools, pour it into silicone baking cups and color them your desired colors. Use more food coloring for more vibrant colors.

When the homemade paint is completely cool, let your kids dip their little fingers into it and let the good times begin!

We used cardstock paper because it is a little slicker than computer or art paper and it holds up to the thickness of the finger paint.

Once the paintings are done, let them dry for a few hours before displaying them or letting kids take them.

finger painting fingers

Making A Charm Bracelet

seahorse charm bracelet

Recently my two young daughters and I had a bit of time on our hands and decided to try a new activity. We decided to make a charm bracelet. We went shopping on Amazon to purchase all that we’d need and then some. I must admit that we purchased a little bit more than we needed but it all looked so fun and who could blame us for getting excited about spending time together doing a special project.

Charm bracelets are a favorite of mine which I’m trying to get my daughters involved in. I’ve given them each a very special charm bracelet which I give them charms as gifts for special events, holidays, and whatnot.

There are so many charm bracelets that you can make so we’re really starting off this crafting session with the sky being the limit.

One idea which my daughter had was to take a piece of thin rope or cord (you could use thick yarn in a pinch) and to begin with tying a knot at the end of the rope or cord (leaving enough room to tie the ends together when you’ve finished with your project), string your chosen charm onto the material you’ve decided to work with,  tie another knot, and continue on with this until you’ve strung your last charm on the bracelet, and then tie it off. I went ahead and ordered this bead storage box to sort all of our awesome beads and charms. It came with a bunch of beads which was just what we needed so it was a perfect addition to all of our tools and jewelry making materials.

Another idea which they came up with was using their jewelry making kit  to make charm bracelets for their friends. I love this kit because it teaches them basic jewelry making techniques which not only produces really cute bracelets but also gives them the confidence they need to go on and make more detailed and complicated jewery pieces in the future.

I chose a simple charm bracelet and some really cute and meaningful charms to create charm bracelets for my daughters and myself.
         

These are just a few of the charms I used to make our bracelets. There are literally hundreds of charms out there so go out there and find them and most of all enjoy making your very own charm bracelet.

 

I would love to hear about your experiences making charm bracelets with your children in the comments below.

Kelli M. Riebesehl Mommy Blogger
Follow along with Shooting Stars And Little Toy Cars on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest or Subscribe by Email or Bloglovin’!

Some of the links in this post are our referral links (to products we not only believe in but also very happily use ourselves), meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a commission if you make a purchase. The commission we earn helps us to keep our blogs up and running smoothly. We thank you! O:)

All activities here are activities I feel are safe for my own children.  As your child’s parents/guardians, you will need to decide what you feel is safe for your family.  I always encourage contacting your child’s pediatrician for guidance if you are not sure about the safety/age appropriateness of an activity. All activities on this blog are intended to be performed with adult supervision.  Appropriate and reasonable caution should be used when activities call for the use of materials that could potentially be harmful, such as scissors, or items that could present a choking risk (small items), or a drowning risk (water activities), and with introducing a new food/ingredient to a child (allergies).  Observe caution and safety at all times.  The author and blog disclaim liability for any damage, mishap, or injury that may occur from engaging in any of these activities on this blog.

Kelli M. Riebesehl | Mommy Blogger

 

How To Fix Slime That Didn’t Work Out

Slime gone wrong

I’m crazy about slime and slime recipes. We make a ton of it at our house and as you can imagine, sometimes the slime recipe goes wrong and we find ourselves wondering just how to fix slime that didn’t work out. Slime, in particular, seems to cause people a lot of trouble and I’m here to help. So for those of you looking into how to fix slime that didn’t work out, look no further. Simply follow my instructions and if you want individualized attention just email me with pictures of your slime woes and I will send you a fix that’s specific to your specific problems. My email address isshootingstarsanlittletoycars@gmail.com.

So first thing’s first – the slime recipe that I decided to troubleshoot is the one that uses clear glue (aka PVA) and liquid starch (Sta Flo) since it seems to be the one that causes the most trouble for folks.  (If you are using our laundry detergent recipe, you can follow this same set of directions.  Keep in mind that the laundry detergent is a direct substitute for liquid starch.)  The first interesting thing I learned is that over time the liquid starch will settle.  This was leading to a lot of inconsistency in and of itself.  So the first thing I learned about this slime recipe is:
Always shake your liquid starch container a bit to make sure that it is well-mixed.
Now that you’ve shaken your liquid starch, let’s look at the two ways this slime can go wrong.
First way:  Not enough liquid starch
How do you know if this is your issue?  Your slime will be stringy – it will stick to your fingers a ton.  As you stir, you’ll see little strings of glue grabbing your spoon.  If you grab a section of your slime, it won’t lift out in a glob – just a small stringy portion will stretch up.
The solution to this problem is to add more liquid starch, approximately one Tablespoon at a time.  Stir well to mix in between each addition of liquid starch.  You’ll know you’ve added enough when you no longer see those strings of glue grabbing your spoon as you stir, and you’ll be able to lift all or most of the slime out if you grab a section of it.  After a few minutes of kneading it will be just right and certainly not sticky. A slime that’s had too much liquid starch added will be stringy, but NOT sticky.  It won’t stick to your fingers – it will slide right off.  It won’t stick to a spoon or even to itself.  It’s just gross looking clumps of goo ( we’re talking seriously SUPER gross here).  You can see strands of floating slime, and there will be standing liquid starch.
How do you fix it?  First, pour off any standing liquid starch.  Then add clear glue approximately 1/4 cup at a time and stir.  Once the slime starts holding together, you will need to knead it by hand.  After adding glue and kneading for 2-3 minutes, it will be just like new!  It will gel even more cohesive if left overnight in a sealed bag.
So what does perfect slime look like?  It holds together and doesn’t have any strings of glue or standing liquid starch. If you grab it, it moves as one cohesive unit. 
Kneading it for a minute or two will make it smoother and help it form into a more cohesive unit.
Because we’ve noticed that the amount of liquid starch needed varies wildly from slime to slime (depending a ton on what you add to it – food coloring, liquid watercolors, glitter, etc), I really recommend adding whatever amount of glue you’d like (we usually make a slime batch with two bottles of clear glue, but even one bottle makes a decent amount of slime) to a container and then slowly adding liquid starch – about 1 Tablespoon at a time – and stirring between each addition until you have slime that looks amooth and well blended with no bubbles.
Once you’ve made your slime, be sure to knead it for a few minutes to make it uniform (honestly, you can just hand it to your kid to play and that will mix it for you!).  Store it in an airtight container or Ziploc bag when you aren’t using it.  It will keep for several weeks. And don’t worry if it bubbles.  That’s normal.
I also found that vinegar will dissolve this slime – just in case you get any on your carpet or clothing!
I hope this helps those of you who have had slimes backfire on you in the past!
Did it help with your slime recipe?
Kelli M. Riebesehl Mommy Blogger
Follow along with Shooting Stars And Little Toy Cars on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest or Subscribe by Email or Bloglovin’!

Some of the links in this post are our referral links (to products we not only believe in but also very happily use ourselves), meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a commission if you make a purchase. The commission we earn helps us to keep our blogs up and running smoothly. We thank you! O:)

All activities here are activities I feel are safe for my own children.  As your child’s parents/guardians, you will need to decide what you feel is safe for your family.  I always encourage contacting your child’s pediatrician for guidance if you are not sure about the safety/age appropriateness of an activity. All activities on this blog are intended to be performed with adult supervision.  Appropriate and reasonable caution should be used when activities call for the use of materials that could potentially be harmful, such as scissors, or items that could present a choking risk (small items), or a drowning risk (water activities), and with introducing a new food/ingredient to a child (allergies).  Observe caution and safety at all times.  The author and blog disclaim liability for any damage, mishap, or injury that may occur from engaging in any of these activities on this blog.

Kelli M. Riebesehl | Mommy Blogger

Let’s Make Kindness Stones

kindness rocks

Have you ever heard of or made kindness stones or rocks before? It’s so easy to do. Really. So let’s make kindness stones right now.

You know yesterday I was talking to my mom on the phone and we had a great conversation as usual.

It is the best feeling in the whole world to really be best friends with your mom (and dad too- it’s just he was out walking their fur baby- yes my little sister 🙂 )  and be of an age where you really get your parents and where they’ve been raising me and my sisters and helping raise their grandchildren.

But back to the conversation, she is feeling a little down because she is facing some health scares and I really wanted to do something to send some kindness/love her way to brighten her day. However I needed some inspiration and then I remembered that I had recently read the blog, Coffee Cups And Crayons, and come across kindness stones/rocks which at that moment made me want so very much to be able to leave these kindness stones around her yard or on the path they walk their fur baby on.

Wouldn’t that be such an awesome way to brighten her spirits? She could find them, collect them, arrange them in a special way to have as a memory, or place them in special places for others to find them to brighten their days and chase their woes away. Knowing her, she would definitely want to spread the love and kindness to others. The only problem is I live in Arizona and she lives in Colorado. 

I came up with another plan of action to cheer her up but imagine just how much joy you could deliver to some passerby if they come across some of your hand designed rocks created with love meant to bring random acts of kindness their way.

Kindness stones are really easy to make. (Now some inner nuttiness shining through here: re-reading this sentence made me think I was seeing Kidney Stones at first and then I just had to giggle thinking about all those little calcium stones in there painted with hearts, balloons, and everything else full of love and kindness and I mean it- I swear my Kidney Stones have never felt better not even while on all those amazing hospital drugs they have! 🙂 See- serious nuttiness but in all fairness I warned you!:) )

You decorate the rocks and leave them for others to find. Any age can create them and they are a super fun act of love/kindness that have really surged in popularity in past years. There are even local Facebook Groups that share the pictures of rocks that you have found. What an amazing way to spread kindness in any community especially your own.

Megan from Coffee Cups And Crayons says that once you make one kindness rock you won’t want to stop creating them and that the kindness and love will spread even farther.

Here are the supplies you need:

  • small rocks to decorate (smooth flat ones work best)
  • paint markers, Sharpies, chalk markers (oil based usually work best but may stain clothes so use your judgment)

Making the love rocks is simple! All you need to do is paint or draw a design on the rock that reminds you of love and kindness.

For best results start with a clean, dry rock on a flat surface. Use the markers or paint pens to draw a design on the rock that reminds you of love or kindness. Wait for it to dry and leave it somewhere for someone to find.

Have fun and be sure to send me some pictures of your creative kindness stones/rocks. I can hardly wait to see them! Send them toshootingstarsandlittletoycars@gmail.com

Kelli M. Riebesehl Mommy Blogger
Follow along with Shooting Stars And Little Toy Cars on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest or Subscribe by Email or Bloglovin’!

Some of the links in this post are our referral links (to products we not only believe in but also very happily use ourselves), meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a commission if you make a purchase. The commission we earn helps us to keep our blogs up and running smoothly. We thank you! O:)

All activities here are activities I feel are safe for my own children.  As your child’s parents/guardians, you will need to decide what you feel is safe for your family.  I always encourage contacting your child’s pediatrician for guidance if you are not sure about the safety/age appropriateness of an activity. All activities on this blog are intended to be performed with adult supervision.  Appropriate and reasonable caution should be used when activities call for the use of materials that could potentially be harmful, such as scissors, or items that could present a choking risk (small items), or a drowning risk (water activities), and with introducing a new food/ingredient to a child (allergies).  Observe caution and safety at all times.  The author and blog disclaim liability for any damage, mishap, or injury that may occur from engaging in any of these activities on this blog.

Kelli M. Riebesehl | Mommy Blogger

A List Of The Top Kid’s Craft Supplies To Have On Hand
A List Of The Top Kid's Craft Supplies To Have On Hand
Here is a list of the top kid’s craft supplies to have on hand for crafting with your little ones. Some of these supplies you’ll have on hand from around the house but others you’ll need to purchase for your projects. I’ll also include tips on organizing your craft supplies.
As you get started, find a drawer, box, or cupboard that you can dedicate to craft supplies. You can even use a suitcase or large plastic tub. Having an organized place for all of your materials will help you know what you have when it is time for crafting! 

At my house, I use a large craft cupboard which I am lucky to have. I also commandeered another like cupboard when the first one was filled up with all our supplies. It’s a little taller and roomier. On the top shelf of my tall cupboard (the second one), I keep teaching/learning books and things like staplers and hole punchers. I use medium-sized plastic and large tubs to hold different materials. My tubs are categorized by what is inside them- things to attach (glue, tape, velcro), paint, brushes, foam (foam stickers and sheets), and paper. I also keep a tub for the stickers I collect, random ribbons/decorative items, pom poms and tissue paper, etc. I keep my cupboards locked with child locks.

I also like to pull out a red container with a handle in the middle which can easily be pulled out when it’s time to craft. I keep small materials in there and materials that are used frequently such as tape, glue, glue sticks, dot markers, a pencil, an eraser, crayons, etc. These are just the beginnings of supplies on the list of the top kid’s craft supplies to have on hand

I also keep a large bin for completed projects that I want to save. Most completed projects are hung in our “art gallery” (front of the cupboard) for a few weeks, then we snap a photo and recycle them. Sometimes there are unfinished projects or ones we especially like, so we save a sample and put it in our box. In one of my cupboards, I also fill the bottom shelf with objects we save- toilet rolls, egg cartons, pasta boxes, etc.
And now for a list of the top kid’s craft supplies to have on hand:
things to collect
Things To Collect From Around The House:
aluminum foil
aluminum pie plates
bottle caps
boxes
bubble wrap
buttons
cardboard
cereal boxes
clean, empty food cans
coffee cans with lids
coffee filters
containers with handles
cotton balls
cotton swabs
diaper wipe containers
egg cartons
fabric scraps
felt
greeting cards (used)
jars and lids (empty)
magazines
metal cookie tins
milk cartons
old mittens, socks, and gloves for puppets
old shirt for art smock
paint sample chips
paper bags
paper muffin cup liners
paper plates/cups/bowls
paper scraps
paper towel/toilet paper tubes
pine cones
plastic milk jugs
plastic yogurt, margarine, and sour cream containers
popsicle sticks
rice
rubber bands
sandpaper
shells
shoeboxes with lids
soda bottles (empty)
stickers
string
tissue paper scraps
wrapping paper scraps
things to purchase
Things To Purchase:
beads (large)
cardstock paper (different colors)
chalk
child-safe scissors
contact paper
clothespins
colored pencils
construction paper (lots of colors)
crayons
Elmers glue
felt sheets (different colors)
foam sheets (different colors)
food coloring
glitter glue pens
glue sticks
googly eyes
hole punch
index cards
liquid starch
magnet strips
masking tape
paint brushes (foam)
paper doilies
paint Do-A-Dot art markers
pencil sharpener
pencils
pens
pipe cleaners
pom poms
ruler
sponges
stapler
stickers
straws
tape (double-sided and regular, and several patterns of Duct Tape)
tempera paint
tissue paper
tongue depressors
washable markers
Ziploc freezer bags
Am I missing anything? What are some of your craft items that you go around collecting for your next craft project?
Kelli M. Riebesehl Mommy Blogger
Follow along with Shooting Stars And Little Toy Cars on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest or Subscribe by Email or Bloglovin’!

Some of the links in this post are our referral links (to products we not only believe in but also very happily use ourselves), meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a commission if you make a purchase. The commission we earn helps us to keep our blogs up and running smoothly. We thank you! O:)

All activities here are activities I feel are safe for my own children.  As your child’s parents/guardians, you will need to decide what you feel is safe for your family.  I always encourage contacting your child’s pediatrician for guidance if you are not sure about the safety/age appropriateness of an activity. All activities on this blog are intended to be performed with adult supervision.  Appropriate and reasonable caution should be used when activities call for the use of materials that could potentially be harmful, such as scissors, or items that could present a choking risk (small items), or a drowning risk (water activities), and with introducing a new food/ingredient to a child (allergies).  Observe caution and safety at all times.  The author and blog disclaim liability for any damage, mishap, or injury that may occur from engaging in any of these activities on this blog.

Kelli M. Riebesehl | Mommy Blogger

How To Create The Perfect Rock Candy

Rock Candy Experimment

Rock candy is a great treat to make at home which tastes great and is always a fun recipe and science experiment to do with kids. It’s amazing watching the sugar crystals come to life and adhere to the string or wooden skewer if that’s what you decided to use. Tell your kids that this is how to create the perfect rock candy and get to work following the post below. You’ll enjoy it immensely.      

One thing that is always fun to do is experiment with the different color and flavor combinations as the choices can go on forever. What a great way for kids to engage and really awaken their creativity in the kitchen with you.

I have to warn you this does take quite a bit of patience since it can take up to a week to see your sugar candy form it’s rock crystals. However, watching the sugar crystals form can be a lot of fun especially for children. You can see growth in your rock candy almost immediately (within a few hours).

It is always important to keep in mind that the exact quantity of liquid sugar (I included a link right here in case you are having trouble finding it) you will need depends on the size of jars you’re using and how many rock candy strings or wooden skewers you want. The recipe’s measurements work for about four 12-ounce jars or one quart-sized mason jar. You can easily double or triple the recipe and make more rock candy strings or wooden skewers at once.

What You’ll Need

  • 2 cups water
  • 4 cups granulated sugar 
  • Optional: 1/2 to 1 teaspoon flavoring extract or oil
  • Optional: 2 drops food coloring (This is an incredible kit which is perfect for the serious crafter for any project from making slime, cake decorating, candy making, etc. The projects and colors are endless bringing out your most creative side. Your kids will adore you even more! Check it out!) 

Some of the links in this post are our referral links (to products we not only believe in but also very happily use ourselves), meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a commission if you make a purchase. The commission we earn helps us to keep our blogs up and running smoothly. We thank you! O:)

 

 

How to Make It

Prepare Your Materials

  1. Clean the glass jars thoroughly with hot water. 
  2. For each jar, cut a length of a thick cotton thread a few inches longer than the height of the jar, and tape it to a pencil. Place the pencil across the lip of the jar, and wind it until the thread is hanging about 1 inch from the bottom of the jar. Attaching a paper clip to the bottom of the thread will weigh it down and help it hang straight.
  1. As an alternative, you can use a wooden skewer instead of the string. Use clothespins balanced across the top of the jar to clip it into place.

Make Your Rock Candy

  1. Wet each thread or wooden skewer with water, and roll it in granulated sugar. This base layer gives the sugar crystals something to grab when they start forming. Set these aside to dry while you prepare the sugar syrup.
  2. Place the water in a medium-sized pan and bring it to a boil. Begin adding the sugar, one cup at a time, stirring after each addition. You will notice that it takes longer for the sugar to dissolve after each cup you add. Continue to stir and boil the syrup until all of the sugar has been added and it is completely dissolved. Remove the pan from the heat.
  3. If you are using colors or flavorings, add them at this point. When using an extract, add 1 teaspoon of extract; for flavoring oils, only add 1/2 teaspoon. Make sure you don’t stand right in front of the pan because the scent can be very strong as it rises in the steam. Add 2 to 3 drops of food coloring and stir it in to ensure an even, smooth color.
  4. Allow the sugar syrup to cool for approximately 10 minutes, then pour it into the prepared jars. Lower one sugared string or skewer into each jar until it hangs about 1 inch from the bottom.
  5. Carefully place your jar in a cool place, away from harsh lights, where it can sit undisturbed. Cover the top loosely with plastic wrap or a paper towel.
  6. You should start to see sugar crystals forming within two to four hours. If you see no change after 24 hours, try boiling the sugar syrup again and dissolve another cup of sugar into it. Then pour it back into the jar and insert the string or skewer again.
  1. Allow the rock candy to grow until it is the size you want. Don’t let it grow too large, otherwise, it might start growing into the sides of your jar! Once it has reached the desired size, remove it and allow it to dry for a few minutes, then enjoy or wrap in plastic wrap to save for later.

Favorite Flavors of Rock Candy

You can spend hours combining the colors and the flavors of the rock candy you are making. You can keep it simple like red for cherry, orange for orange, green for lime, and so on and so forth or you can go crazy and use rasberry flavoring and blue food coloring to make blue rasberry or instead of yellow food coloring and lemon extract use banana. There are so many different surprise endings your imagination will need to take a vacation when you finish your creations.   

My suggestion would be to look up different flavorings and coloring choices online to get some inspiration. I listed a kit above that is ideal for this exploration into different flavors and color combinations. It not only works for rock candy but is also awesome for slime recipes. I mean just imagine buttered rum, tutti frutti, black licorice, maple, wintergreen, cinamon, spearmint, etc. Whatever you choose you will have quite the array of choices to entertain your children, friends and family.

Nutritional Guidelines (per serving)
Calories 774
Total Fat 0 g
Saturated Fat 0 g
Unsaturated Fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 4 mg
Carbohydrates 200 g
Dietary Fiber 0 g
Protein 0 g
(The nutrition information on our recipes is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate. Individual results may vary.)
***I used the recipe from The Spruce Eats which is a site I love and rely on often. Be sure to check it out. At first I relied on it religiously but after a few attempts at rock candy perfection (LOL here) I started experimenting with my results and having fun with my creativity (our kids loved it) and really making it mine own but the recipe almost always remained the same from the above website which deserves all the credit. Thank you to The Spruce Eats
Kelli M. Riebesehl Mommy Blogger
Follow along with Shooting Stars And Little Toy Cars on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest or Subscribe by Email or Bloglovin’!

Some of the links in this post are our referral links (to products we not only believe in but also very happily use ourselves), meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a commission if you make a purchase. The commission we earn helps us to keep our blogs up and running smoothly. We thank you! O:)

All activities here are activities I feel are safe for my own children.  As your child’s parents/guardians, you will need to decide what you feel is safe for your family.  I always encourage contacting your child’s pediatrician for guidance if you are not sure about the safety/age appropriateness of an activity. All activities on this blog are intended to be performed with adult supervision.  Appropriate and reasonable caution should be used when activities call for the use of materials that could potentially be harmful, such as scissors, or items that could present a choking risk (small items), or a drowning risk (water activities), and with introducing a new food/ingredient to a child (allergies).  Observe caution and safety at all times.  The author and blog disclaim liability for any damage, mishap, or injury that may occur from engaging in any of these activities on this blog.

Kelli M. Riebesehl | Mommy Blogger

LET’S MAKE A TEACUP CANDLE FOR MOTHER’S DAY!

This is a simple project, but I think the results are so pretty. These make a nice gift or decoration for your house. No special candle-making tools are necessary. You can purchase the candles at a dollar store and pour the wax into an old teacup or mug. I paid $5 total to make these 2 candles.
Total Time: 30 minutes
Source: Pinterest-inspired.
    1. Start by taking the sticker off the bottom of the candle. You will be melting this candle and you don’t want to deal with that sticker in the wax. 99% of the time, the wick pulls right out from the bottom. Take it out. If it doesn’t come out, try the other candle. You can discard the wick or use it to make another candle. I made 2 candles, but I had bought 3 
    2. Put your other candle (with the wick in it), in your cup. If it is too large, you’ll need to melt the sides a bit. Just rest it in your pan and rotate it to make sure it’s even all around.
    3. Melt your other candle (without the wick) on a very low heat. You don’t want it too hot or there is a chance it could crack the cup. I’ve never had this happen, but I am guessing it could if the wax is too hot. Move the candle around. Don’t burn yourself.
    4. Place your cup on a protected surface, such as wax paper or something that you don’t mind wax on. Sometimes, the wax spills and it is a pain to scrape off. Gently pour the wax into the cup. Don’t pour directly over the wick. But don’t pour too close to the sides, either. Pour until the wax reaches the top of your candle.
    5. Let candle harden. If you got some wax on the top part of the cup, gently scrape it off with a butter knife.
    6. I had leftover wax, so I made a second cup. To do so, place the leftover wick in the teacup. Place pencils or pens on either side of the wick to hold it in place once the wax has been poured in. You want it as centered as possible. Pour your wax in. If you don’t have enough, open up another candle and melt that. Once the wax has been poured in, keep an eye on it as it hardens. Sometimes the wick will start to fall over. Just put it back in place and push the pencils back to their “holding” position.
    7. Keep for yourself or bag one up and give as a gift. I love this mug and I found it at the dollar store!
Always remember to keep an eye on burning candles and don’t leave them unattended. Be safe!
Kelli M. Riebesehl Mommy Blogger
Follow along with Shooting Stars And Little Toy Cars on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest or Subscribe by Email or Bloglovin’!

Some of the links in this post are our referral links (to products we not only believe in but also very happily use ourselves), meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a commission if you make a purchase. The commission we earn helps us to keep our blogs up and running smoothly. We thank you! O:)

All activities here are activities I feel are safe for my own children.  As your child’s parents/guardians, you will need to decide what you feel is safe for your family.  I always encourage contacting your child’s pediatrician for guidance if you are not sure about the safety/age appropriateness of an activity. All activities on this blog are intended to be performed with adult supervision.  Appropriate and reasonable caution should be used when activities call for the use of materials that could potentially be harmful, such as scissors, or items that could present a choking risk (small items), or a drowning risk (water activities), and with introducing a new food/ingredient to a child (allergies).  Observe caution and safety at all times.  The author and blog disclaim liability for any damage, mishap, or injury that may occur from engaging in any of these activities on this blog.

Kelli M. Riebesehl | Mommy Blogger

And Busy Bags Save The Day!

felt

 

Okay so when you hear that I still pack Busy Bags in my big bag of tricks (yes, I carry an overstuffed over-sized purse- my hubby says I could easily beat an East German shot putter and that on top of that he would never think of getting into a brawl with me-:o) which is something he so couldn’t do to begin with- he’s such a teddy bear!!!)  and that I do it for my tween/teens most of the time- you’re going to laugh but trust me, they are amazing for any age and they literally saved the day the other day.

I was in this monster line the other day in the Courthouse there to file a document with the Clerk Of The Court for one of our clients and this poor mom (she had two young grade schoolers, a toddler, and a maybe 3-4-month-old baby whom she was carrying with no infant seat or stroller in sight. Her baby was fussy and getting fussier. We had started in the very back of the line together but had progressed to a much better place in line with several more behind us and many still in front of us. She was trying everything with the baby and wouldn’t you know it, the toddler and one of the grade schoolers had started in too. The toddler wanted to be held by mom and the grade schooler was bored and had begun running around which encouraged both his younger sister and his older sister to join in. Poor mom was in way over her head- she had gotten the baby to take a bottle and went to gather her youngsters up but they weren’t having any of it. 

I decided to offer a helping hand. I pulled two of my Busy Bags ( from my purse and handed them to her explaining what they were and telling her that they would offer her a break by helping them to settle down and sit in one place (I knew by now that she had no problem letting them sit on the floor as they had been crawling all over it for a little while by now.)

It was awesome. It worked like a charm. The three of them were sitting together on the floor playing with these busy bags and loving them.  One of them was my playdough flower pots bag (see below) and the other one of them was my pipe cleaners bag (see below.)    These bags work great for so many different ages and stages of children (under adult supervision age 1- teens.) I have them in my bag for my kids ready to pounce on them any moment they put their phones down or more like they run out of power.  I take these bags out and play alongside my kids at restaurants or long waits at doctor’s and dentist’s offices and other like situations. It’s awesome because it’s just like they’re little again and yet big with such awesome imaginations and neat skills and applications.

Here are some ideas for Busy Bags:

Playdough Flower Pots

playdough

homemade playdough-  recipe from Teacher Tom 

recipe: 

1-cup flour
1/2-cup salt
2-teaspoons cream of tarter
1-cup water
1-Tablespoon cooking oil
food coloring (optional)
scent (optional, but recommended)

Put everything in a pot and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. You’re looking for the dough to start separating from the sides of the pan (the time this takes depends on how big your batch is). I’ve found that the smoothest results come from stopping when it still seems like it’ll be a little too sticky. Remove and let cool for a bit on wax paper. Add color and knead to distribute color (this is where I mix in green food coloring). I always add a scent (e.g., mint, wintergreen, clove, strawberry, etc.) to keep it smelling fresh.

fake flowers

The Dollar Tree sells bouquets of silk flowers.. for a dollar.  So I picked up a few bouquets and cut the stems short.  I found bags of insects and butterflies (in case you have a hard time finding these in the Dollar Tree you can find them here and here) as well in the DollarTree- what an awesome find to add to the flower pots.

On Amazon, I found these really cute and pliable not to mention unbreakable :o) little flower pots

***Place playdough in the flower pot and then use the flower stems to place the flowers just so and then add the butterflies and bugs however you would like***

Pipe Cleaners Busy Bag

pipe cleaners

Pipe Cleaners and pictures from Bing Images to give your imagination a spark (I just typed in “Pipe Cleaners Crafts”.) 

Here are some other ideas for Busy Bags-

Pasta Necklaces– The process of hand-dyeing pasta is simple, using vinegar and food coloring. The vinegar helps to distribute the food coloring and to ensure that the pasta is color-fast once dry. I prefer it as a child-friendly alternative to rubbing alcohol.  I used every color of the rainbow to give our necklaces some serious color. Pop over to CBS Parents for the recipe and step by step instructions.

pasta necklace

Felt People, Cars With Street Pieces,  Dollhouse Decor With A Family, and other such ideas cut out of felt make awesome Busy Bags.

Scissors With Brite Pleasing To The Eye Pieces To Cut Out– For this bag I use Torn out magazine and like pieces folded up to fit into a Ziplock baggie and safety scissors                                                   Safety-Scissors   

Sewing Busy Bag– For younger kids, you would place made for kids plastic needles and yarn and some sewing cards or felt pieces and some large buttons and for the older age you would put in some pieces of fabric, some buttons, a cut out fabric pattern, a sharpie pen, and anything else you can think of. 

Sewing cards 

One last Busy Bags idea is a Sticker Busy Bag– you take a bunch of different stickers from all over the place representing many different activities, people, places, things, etc., a bunch of multi-colored pens and paper and you have the kids make many different scenes with the stickers and pens and paper.

  Some of the links in this post are our referral links (to products we not only believe in but also very happily use ourselves), meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a commission if you make a purchase. The commission we earn helps us to maintain our blogs.

What are some Busy Bags you would make to keep your kids busy and what ages are you trying to keep busy? Let me know in the comments section?

Kelli M. Riebesehl Mommy Blogger
Follow along with Shooting Stars And Little Toy Cars on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest or Subscribe by Email or Bloglovin’!

Some of the links in this post are our referral links (to products we not only believe in but also very happily use ourselves), meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a commission if you make a purchase. The commission we earn helps us to keep our blogs up and running smoothly. We thank you! O:)

All activities here are activities I feel are safe for my own children.  As your child’s parents/guardians, you will need to decide what you feel is safe for your family.  I always encourage contacting your child’s pediatrician for guidance if you are not sure about the safety/age appropriateness of an activity. All activities on this blog are intended to be performed with adult supervision.  Appropriate and reasonable caution should be used when activities call for the use of materials that could potentially be harmful, such as scissors, or items that could present a choking risk (small items), or a drowning risk (water activities), and with introducing a new food/ingredient to a child (allergies).  Observe caution and safety at all times.  The author and blog disclaim liability for any damage, mishap, or injury that may occur from engaging in any of these activities on this blog.

Kelli M. Riebesehl | Mommy Blogger

BEST WAY TO MAKE SLIME

Best Way To Make Slime

homemade slime

Look no further than right here if you’re looking for the best way to make slime. We have an easy way to make any kind of slime you’re looking for. Whether you’re looking for fluffy, gooey, glittery, edible, soft, fluffy, etc. we have it here for you. Using contact solution, glue, soap or laundry detergent. There are many slime recipes to choose from!

My little ones have you might say become somewhat of what you would call slime connoisseurs. They know their slime and that, of course, comes from hours upon hours of playing with it and also creating it by every method imaginable. They can make every color imaginable and of course every consistency. 

That being said, the average person might wonder what is the way to make slime? That is the question to be for sure! Last year marked the beginning of the slime craze and this is where my kids took theirs already in place love for slime to new heights. My youngest has and still is somewhat obsessed with the slimy sticky stuff and makes different recipes depending on what day of the week it is or which way the wind is blowing if you catch my drift. The mood at this age (11 years old) is where it’s at. I think whatever it is his older sisters have (late tweens/early teenage-itis) is catching. Depending on his mood and the availability of wherever he finds a spare moment he is always experimenting to see if he can make a new and exciting version of one of his cool recipes that he’s already established. 

This is how to make slime with glue. This is an easy recipe using just a few ingredients, and you can make it any color you want. This is the best way to make slime that is very pliable and that is the base to most other of the slime recipes too. 

***As always when it comes to children and experimenting with slime you need to always be present as a parent, please read our safety disclosure before trying any of our (or fellow bloggers) recipes.

Here’s that recipe and more attached:

Slime With Glue

  1. Glue – if they do a lot of experimenting just buy a gallon of white or clear comes out a bit different but cool, just more expensive (see below pic.)
  2. Contact lens cleaning solution
  3. Foaming hand soap (We tried this soap for the price and ended up loving the scent- it turned our slime (with sequins)  into our favorite one which we  named Pretty Peachy
  4. Liquid starch – this is what we use
  5. Laundry detergent – Tide is the best for our 2 ingredient laundry detergent slime recipe below
  6. Food coloring – totally optional, I prefer she doesn’t use it to keep it off my carpet and furniture
  7. Shaving cream
  8. Small items – beads, sequins, glitter, mini google eyes, fake snow, small rubber toys, etc… can be added for texture and look
  9. Borax – you need to be VERY careful and only adults should handle this if used when making slime

******If you want to make slime with glue and glitter then just add the desired amount of glitter to the mixture.******

How to Make Slime without Borax:

  • 6 teaspoons of Metamucil
  • 3 cups water
  • 6 drops of food coloring (optional)

Dissolve the Metamucil completely in the water by stirring it. My kids absolutely love to shake shake shake the Metamucil dumped into a jar with a tight-fitting lid until it ’s dissolved!

Heat the mixture on the stove over medium-high heat for about 3-5 minutes.  Let it cool and then start playing!

Homemade Glow In The Dark Slime Recipe

-makes about 2 cups

2 Elmer’s white glue bottles (4oz)
3-4 tablespoons glow in the dark paint
Water
Neon food coloring
1 teaspoon borax
1/2 cup warm water

Some of the links in this post are our referral links/affiliate links (to products we not only believe in but also very happily use ourselves), meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a commission if you make a purchase. The commission we earn helps us to maintain our blogs.

Kool-aid Slime Recipe (affiliate links provided)
                   
                  
  • 1 cup of water
  • Optional: Kool-aid packets for scent/color or food dye for richer color
Instructions
  • Make sure that the Metamucil you are using contains psyllium. You can also use a generic fiber brand as long as it has psyllium.
  • In a LARGE microwaveable bowl combine 1 tablespoon of Metamucil or similar with 1 cup of water and stir well.  You can also add a few drops of food coloring for rich coloring or a half packet of Kool-aid for scent/color if desired.  
  • Stir the ingredients until everything is dissolved
  • Then place the bowl in the microwave and heat on high until you start to see bubbles (roughly 2 minutes) . Continue to microwave the bubbling slime for one minute.  Then stop the microwave & stir.
  • Once stirred microwave again for two more minutes. 
  • Remove the bowl from the microwave and allow it to cool.  At this point, the slime will still be liquid, but it will thicken as it cools.  Once it is completely cool it will be ready for the kids to play with it!
    • Be sure to check that the center of the slime is cool before giving it to kids.
    • Repeat the above instructions for each color & scent of slime you wish to make.  You can easily double and triple the ingredients for each slime variety, but be sure to use a LARGE bowl and keep your eye on the microwave. 
    • We made several batches of slime, and each color turned out slightly different.  This may be because the kids were helping mix the ingredients.  Some of the colors were super slimy and others were REALLY stretchy.  ALL of them were tons of fun!
    PLAYTIME
    Once all the slime varieties were cool I gave it to the kids to play & explore

    They began by exploring each slime color individually.  Each color having a slightly different texture was really cool and definitely fascinating to all that were there, but soon enough all of them were mixed and blended which was really quite colorful and to some even quite pretty!

    You can really see the unique texture of the slime when you stretch it and roll it in your hands, which was what really made this slime tons of FUN!  Adding a touch of Kool-aid powder also made the slime smell AMAZING!  I also love that this slime is 100% taste-safe and borax free.
    The girls played and played- stretching, pulling, mixing colors, and laughing so hard while my son was the mad scientist creating the end product.

    Note:  While this slime is edible it is not meant for all-out consumption.  A taste or two is totally fine, but you would not want your kids to eat a lot.  Honestly, they really don’t want to; one tiny taste was enough for my bunch to stick out their tongue and pretend to gag! ******Metamucil can be found in a variety of pharmacy aisles or online here.  One container of Metamucil will allow you to make SEVERAL batches of slime over time.  For rich coloring add a few drops of food coloring or use Kool-aid.******   We stored our slime in airtight containers in the fridge.  This is our first time making it, but I imagine it won’t last for very long.   We added half a packet of Kool-aid to our recipe, and that gave us amazing scented slime.

******You can make slime with just about any candy or edible treat you can think of such as Gummy Bears, Laffy Taffy, Skittles, Starburst, and so many more… My only concerns would be that you refrigerate your slime and have it out to play with it for only a couple of hours at a time and that you only taste or sample small amounts not consume it.****** Also Boo Boo, our German Shepherd Mix puppy was doing her very best to try some so I would say it is probably not for pets!

What is your best slime recipe? What kinds of things do you add to your slime recipe to make it more fun? I’d love to hear from you!

Kelli M. Riebesehl Mommy Blogger
Follow along with Shooting Stars And Little Toy Cars on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest or Subscribe by Email or Bloglovin’!

Some of the links in this post are our referral links (to products we not only believe in but also very happily use ourselves), meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a commission if you make a purchase. The commission we earn helps us to keep our blogs up and running smoothly. We thank you! O:)

All activities here are activities I feel are safe for my own children.  As your child’s parents/guardians, you will need to decide what you feel is safe for your family.  I always encourage contacting your child’s pediatrician for guidance if you are not sure about the safety/age appropriateness of an activity. All activities on this blog are intended to be performed with adult supervision.  Appropriate and reasonable caution should be used when activities call for the use of materials that could potentially be harmful, such as scissors, or items that could present a choking risk (small items), or a drowning risk (water activities), and with introducing a new food/ingredient to a child (allergies).  Observe caution and safety at all times.  The author and blog disclaim liability for any damage, mishap, or injury that may occur from engaging in any of these activities on this blog.

Kelli M. Riebesehl | Mommy Blogger

 
 

 

%d bloggers like this: